Common Name(s): Pacific Coast Maple, Bigleaf maple, Oregon maple
Scientific Name: Acer macrophyllum
Distribution: Coastal regions of Pacific North America
Tree Size: 80-100 ft (25-30 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
Average Dried Weight: 545 kg/m3 MC12%
Shrinkage: Radial: 3.7%, Tangential: 7.1%, Volumetric: 11.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.9
Color/Appearance: Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown. Bigleaf maple is known for its (occasional) quilted grain patterns.
Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.
Rot Resistance: Being that the sapwood of maple is used, and not the heartwood, it is non-durable to perishable in regard to decay resistance.
Workability: Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.
Common Uses: Veneer, paper (pulpwood), boxes, crates/pallets, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.
Comments: Bigleaf maple is appropriately named, as its leaves  (illustrated below) are the largest of any maple, commonly reaching an overall width of 6 to 12 inches (15-30 cm) across.
Bigleaf maple is a commercially important hardwood timber for the United States’ west coast, where it is virtually the only commercial maple species in the region. It is considered to be in the grouping of soft maples, and its wood is lighter, softer, and weaker than that of hard maple.

Impressions
Pacific Coast Maple. Click on the picture to enlarge (Homé Hout, 2024)